The Arc Responds to Reports on the Widespread Use of Solitary Confinement for Immigrant Detainees, Including People with Disabilities

Washington, DC – This week, reports have surfaced documenting that thousands of immigrants have been trapped in solitary confinement in immigration detention centers, often based solely on their disability status or their gender identity.

“These atrocious reports of cruel confinement in isolation, without necessary services, in circumstances that are traumatizing and dangerous to the people involved, are unacceptable.

“Non-citizens with any type of disability should have a fair opportunity to enter and reside legally in the United States and to become citizens, without unnecessary or discriminatory restrictions based on their disability, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation.  We must also ensure that individuals with disabilities who are facing deportation or other legal action are provided with appropriate representation, due process protections, and reasonable accommodations and that they are not unnecessarily segregated in immigration facilities.

“We have already seen proposals like the public charge rule that would discriminate against immigrants with disabilities, making it harder to legally enter or remain in the country. We continue to condemn these policies and practices and call on Members of Congress, as they have done in the past, to stand up for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families as they seek inclusion in America.   We will continue to promote and protect equal rights of children and adults with disabilities in all parts of the world, and call on our government to ensure that, at minimum, people should not be subject to harm while they are held under the care and authority of this country,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

The Arc advocates for and serves people wit­­h intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 600 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

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